Ethiopian honey sold in NorwayEthiopian honey sold in Norway

Sweet Trade

Last updated: 31.05.2010 // Ethiopian honey was recently introduced in Norway and is growing in popularity.

Semi-extraction equipment used by beekeepers. 
Photo: Royal Norwegian Embassy in Addis Ababa.Semi-extraction equipment used by beekeepers. Photo: Royal Norwegian Embassy in Addis Ababa

This article was published in the Embassy's business enclosure to the Capital 16 May. Find more articles from the enclosure here.

The Norwegian honey production is currently too small to meet the needs of the Norwegian consumers, and Honningcentralen has therefore been looking for a good honey from elsewhere in the world. A preliminary search in Africa was conducted in cooperation with NORAD and the Development Fund. As Ethiopia has the largest number of bee colonies in Africa, it is no surprise that honey of good quality and relevant partners to start business were found here. The result was an establishment of partnership with two local companies, Tutu and Her Family and Apinec Agro-industry, that showed solid experience and the ability to deliver the required quantity and quality of semi-processed honey.


In September 2009 the first 40 tons of honey was imported from Ethiopia with a great reception by the Norwegian consumers. Since then this amount has gradually increased to 80 tons this year. The ambition is that 100-200 tons of honey from Ethiopia will be exported to Norway over the next 1-2 years.


The honey that the Norwegian company imports comes from the highland areas of the Kaffa region in South West Ethiopia, where low pollution and the tropical rainforest vegetation gives the honey a fruity and fresh taste. The honey is similar in taste and texture to the Norwegian summer honey with a slightly spicier undertone.

 

This is purely business for us, but if we succeed, this will provide fertile ground for Ethiopia to be able to export honey also to other developed countries," said general manager in Honningcentralen, Roger Hem.

 

Modern beehive production facility in Bonga by Apinec Agro-Industries. 
Photo: Royal Norwegian Embassy in Addis Ababa.Modern beehive production facility in Bonga by Apinec Agro-Industries. Photo: Royal Norwegian Embassy in Addis Ababa
The Development Fund has for many years supported sustainable development work in Ethiopia. The support to increasing the honey value chain has created a new and important source of income for families in the rural areas.

 
This is part of a project that also aims to increase the capacity of the Ethiopian beekeepers by transferring knowledge and technology with the aim of increasing their production capacity and market access which in turn will increase their income. Through time it will be able to serve as an example of best practice of development thorough commercial success.

 
Ethiopia is Africa's biggest honey producer and the world's fourth biggest beeswax exporter. However, the sector is still far from reaching its potential due to the traditional beekeeping methods and the lack of a well developed processing industry. In order to change this, the project has set up production facilities for modern bee hives which is distributed to the beekeepers. A farmer may be able to produce 5-8 kg. of honey through the traditional method while the modern techniques will be able to give up to 25 kg. honey within 2-3 years. That is a quadrupling of the farmers’ incomes. In addition the project has established honey collection centers in several areas of the region equipped with modern semi-extraction equipment which significantly reduces the time and the labor involved in processing honey.

 
Honningcentralen is a Norwegian processor and distributor of honey with two processing plants, at Kløfta and Grimstad. It is organised as an agricultural cooperative with 1,650 members.

This article was published in the Embassy's business enclosure to the Capital 16 May. Find more articles from the enclosure here.


Source: Tehetena Woldemariam   |   Bookmark and Share